logical fallacies fallacy

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Category: Logical Fallacies

affirming a disjunct logical fallacy
Logical Fallacies

Affirming a Disjunct

Making the false assumption that when presented with an either/or possibility, that if one of the options is true that the other one must be false.  This is when the “or” is not explicitly defined as being exclusive.

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false dilemma fallacy
Logical Fallacies

False Dilemma

When only two choices are presented yet more exist, or a spectrum of possible choices exists between two extremes.  False dilemmas are usually characterised by “either this or that” language, but can also be characterised by omissions of choices.

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unwarranted contrast fallacy
Logical Fallacies

Unwarranted Contrast

Assuming that implicature means implication, when it logically does not.  Implicature is a relation between the fact that someone makes a statement and a proposition.  Implication is a relation between propositions, that is, the meanings of statements.

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affirmative conclusion from a negative premise
Logical Fallacies

Affirmative Conclusion from a Negative Premise

The conclusion of a standard form categorical syllogism is affirmative, but at least one of the premises is negative. Any valid forms of categorical syllogisms that assert a negative premise must have a negative conclusion.

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appeal to common belief
Logical Fallacies

Appeal to Common Belief

When the claim that most or many people in general or of a particular group accept a belief as true is presented as evidence for the claim.

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logical fallacy ad fidentia
Logical Fallacies

Ad Fidentia

Attacking the person’s self-confidence in place of the argument or the evidence.

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AVOIDING THE ISSUE
Logical Fallacies

Avoiding The Issue

When an arguer responds to an argument by not addressing the points of the argument.  Unlike the strawman fallacy, avoiding the issue does not create an unrelated argument to divert attention, it simply avoids the argument.

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Selective Attention Fallacy
Logical Fallacies

Selective Attention

Focusing your attention on certain aspects of the argument while completely ignoring or missing other parts.

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whataboutery whatabout whataboutism
Logical Fallacies

Whataboutism?

Whataboutism or whataboutery (as in “what about…?”) denotes in a pejorative sense a procedure in which a critical question or argument is not answered or discussed, but retorted with a critical counter-question which expresses a counter-accusation.

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